Queer4Feminism

Toronto || Feminist || Queer

what are all the things a queer feminist art loving womyn can do in Pittsburg???

“ALONE WE COULD NOT HAVE FUCKED THINGS UP WITH SUCH SKILL AND GRACE”

“OUR COLLECTIVE FLATULENCE WAS ENVIABLE OUR STRENGTH THE STENCH”

“THE UNBELIEVABLE SMELL WE WERE ABLE TO CREATE TOGETHER”

— Hazel Meyer

womanhouse:

Xavier Antin, Just in Time, or A Short History of Production, (2010)
A book printed through a printing chain made of four desktop printers using four different colors and technologies dated from 1880 to 1976. A production process that brings together small scale and large scale production, two sides of the same history.
MAGENTA (Stencil duplicator, 1880)
CYAN (Spirit duplicator, 1923)
BLACK (Laser printer, 1969)
YELLOW (Inkjet printer, 1976)
(via)

womanhouse:

Xavier Antin, Just in Time, or A Short History of Production, (2010)

A book printed through a printing chain made of four desktop printers using four different colors and technologies dated from 1880 to 1976. A production process that brings together small scale and large scale production, two sides of the same history.

  • MAGENTA (Stencil duplicator, 1880)
  • CYAN (Spirit duplicator, 1923)
  • BLACK (Laser printer, 1969)
  • YELLOW (Inkjet printer, 1976)

(via)

1 week ago

Femme invisibility and the economy of masculine desire in the queer community

Have any cis/femme identified womyn noticed that the dominance of masculine desire in the queer community works to ( sometimes ) make you feel invisible?

Because i no longer have a short bowl cut and wear button ups, I am now hit on by men and cat called all the time and essentially invisible to the economy of queer desire. 

This economy of queer desire has really contributed to making me feel alienated from queer visibility. Lets really start talking about the ways capitalism and misogyny are embedded in the construction and desire of masculinity. The misogyny of masculine desire and the erasure of femme visibility has me thinking about the way in which queer communities and dominant models of desiring contribute to feelings of inclusion and exclusion. How does normative discourses of gender identity become embedded in queer desires? How do cis/femme identified women overcome misogynistic norms and assert their queerness? 

Mostly, though, I watched a lot of TV. A lot. I’m pretty sure half my conscious life was spent “waiting for something good to come on” and puzzling over the inner lives of Darrin and Samantha and the Brady Bunch. I was so anesthetized by it that one afternoon I almost electrocuted myself by mindlessly sucking on an extension cord while watching Star Trek. That moment was something of a wake-up call, actually. Chris Ware